First Job or New Job

Photo by Skitterphoto from Pexels

HOW MUCH AND WHEN WILL I BE PAID?

The minimum wage in Alberta is:

  • $15.00 an hour for most employees
  • $13.00 an hour for students under 18
  • $ 598 a week for many salespersons, land agents and other specified professionals
  • $ 2,848 a month for domestic employees.

 

Your employer can pay you in cash, by cheque, or by direct deposit (putting payment directly into your bank account).

Your employer must establish a pay period to calculate your wages, overtime hours, vacation pay, and other details. Typical pay periods are once a week, every two weeks, or once a month. Your employer must pay you at least once a month and within 10 days of the end of each pay period.

WHAT INFORMATION WILL BE ON MY PAY STUBS?

A pay stub (also called a pay slip or statement of earnings and deductions) is a record of what you have earned and what has been deducted from your earnings. An employer must give you a pay stub, regardless of how you are paid.

A pay stub must show:

  • regular and overtime hours of work
  • wage rate and overtime rate
  • details of the earnings you’ve been paid; for example, vacation pay, holiday pay, and overtime
  • deductions from earnings and the reason for each deduction
  • time off instead of overtime pay
  • period of employment covered by the pay stub

 

Check your pay stub as soon as you get it to make sure it’s accurate. Keep your pay stubs. You may need them if there’s a dispute between you and your employer or your employer goes out of business and owes you money.

WHAT WILL BE DEDUCTED FROM MY PAY?

Employers are only allowed to make certain deductions from your pay. Some deductions are mandatory and some are optional.

Mandatory deductions may include:

  • federal and provincial income tax
  • Employment Insurance premiums (EI)
  • Canada Pension Plan contributions (CPP)
  • money authorized by a collective agreement, such as union dues
  • deductions resulting from a judgment or court order

 

Other deductions, which you must approve in writing, may include:

  • Medical and/or dental premiums
  • Life insurance coverage
  • Personal savings plans

 

Employers may not deduct money for cash shortages or loss of property, unless you have sole access to the cash or property. Employers may deduct money for other purposes, such as uniforms, parking or a coffee fund, but only if you sign a form allowing them to do so.

WHERE AND WHEN IS THE SHIFT SCHEDULE POSTED?

Signing in and out of your shifts helps both you and your employer keep track of your hours of work. If you’re not required to sign in and out, it’s still a good idea to keep your own written record of the hours you work.

Your employer must tell you when to start and finish your work by posting schedules where employees can see them or by any other rea- sonable method. Your employer must notify you at least 24 hours before a shift change. If there is a shift change, you must be allowed at least eight hours of rest between shifts.

WHAT SCHEDULED REST BREAKS AND WHAT DAYS OFF WILL I HAVE?

In each shift longer than five hours, you’re enti- tled to at least 30 minutes of rest. This rest period can be one 30-minute break, two 15-min- ute breaks, or three 10-minute breaks. When you work a shift that is less than five hours, your employer does not have to provide a break.

Your employer must provide you with weekly rest days or days off. You must get one day of rest each week OR rest days as follows:

After 24 consecutive days of work, you must get at least four consecutive days off.

ARE THERE ANY OTHER RULES I NEED TO KNOW ABOUT?

Alberta’s Employment Standards Code and Employment Standards Regulation are the minimum requirements for nearly all employers and employees in the province. Find out all you can about the conditions of your employment. Your employer may have an employee handbook or policy manual that states the rules or guidelines for dress codes and appearance, being late for work, missing a shift, and other workplace issues.

AM I OLD ENOUGH TO WORK FOR YOU?

If you’re 12, 13, or 14 years old, you can work in certain occupations, for example; as a retail clerk, a newspaper deliverer, or an office clerk or messenger. If you’re 15, 16, or 17 years old, there are also some restric- tions about where and when you can work.

WILL I WORK ON GENERAL HOLIDAYS?

Alberta recognizes the following nine general holidays:

New Year’s Day

Alberta Family Day

Good Friday

Victoria Day

Canada Day

Labour Day

Thanksgiving Day

Remembrance Day

Christmas Day

If you’re entitled to general holiday pay and you work on that day, you will be paid your average daily wage plus time-and-a-half for every hour you work, or you may receive your regular wage for every hour you work plus a day off with pay. If you are entitled to general holiday pay and do not work on the holiday, you will receive at least your average daily wage as general holiday pay.

Recent Articles

How to Make Your Home a Calming and Comfortable Space

During COVID-19 many of us are spending more time at home than ever before and our environment can have a big impact on our mental health...

Health and Mental Health

8 Tips to Cut Expenses & Manage Your Money in Difficult Times

Whether it’s a global pandemic, job loss, illness or something in between, tough times unfortunately happen to everyone at some point...

Community & Social Services

Volunteering During the Covid-19 Response

In honour of national volunteer week April 19-25, 2020, here are three important elements to consider when volunteering during this pande...

Community & Social Services